1. What types of files can I send to A to Z printing?
You may send .jpg, .jpeg, .psd, .tif, .tiff, .eps, .ai, .cdr, .pdf, and .png
We recommend saving as a PDF

2. What color mode should my files be?
If you send us an RGB file, there is a chance that a color shift may occur and you may not be satisfied with your job. You should always start and finish your designs in CMYK color mode.

3. What resolution should my file be?
Low resolution files may be printed as is or will be placed on hold until we receive new files, slowing your turnaround. We recommend 300 dpi files and no less.

4. How should I set up my bleed and crop marks?

Bleed must extend further than the cut line. Using our A to Z Templates can help visualize this. Please keep all text and anything you do not want cut at least .125" away from the cut line.
Click here to go to our template download page.

5. Does A to Z printing accept borders on jobs?

Yes, but if the border is too close to the cutline, it may be cut off-center slightly. We cut through many sheets at a time, so it is possible that some borders may not be even on all sides.

6. How should I set up my file for proper resolution?
Do not send your files rotated if both sides read the same way. When one side reads different than the other, you should align the file how you want them printed before you send the files. For files not properly set up, A to Z will use best judgment and will not be responsible for improper rotation.

7. Should I send a proof sample file?
When sending artwork, do not send extra files, like proofs or samples, because they might get printed. Only send the files you need printed. We are not responsible for these kinds of files being printed. Unless requested by one of our employees, DO NOT send files that you do not want to be printed.

8. Can I submit multiple files in one document?
No. we are now specifically set up to process one side at a time, and this requires that each side of a job must be on a separate file. Not separating files will cause delays and you might have to send the files again.
Remember to separate the pages of your PDF files as well.

9. How can I make sure my blues do not come out purple?
When using a blue in your design, always make sure to leave at least a 30% difference in your Cyan and Magenta values. Blue is close to purple in the CMYK spectrum. Remember, use a low amount of magenta whenever using high amounts of cyan to avoid purple. Example: C-100 M-70 Y-0 K-0

10. How do I get a grayscale image in a CMYK document?
Grayscale images that are converted to CMYK will have a color shift in the final print. That shift may be green or yellow. Always check the CMYK values of your grayscale in the final CMYK document. If there are other values other than K in your grayscale image, there is a chance that the color will vary. To eliminate all values other than K, use your Channel Mixer (adjustment layer) in Photoshop, then click "Monochrome" and adjust accordingly.

11. What is rich black and how can I get it?
Rich black is an ink mixture of solid black, 100% K, with additional CMY ink values. This results in a darker tone than black ink alone. If you print black alone as 100% K, the resulting black may not be as dark as you might like. We recommend using C 60 M 40 Y 40 K 100. This will give you a deep, dark, rich black. However, for text, since registration may slightly shift and cause a blur like effect, we recommend using 100% K only, especially for smaller fonts.

12. Why is there cracking on my scoring job?
When a job is coated with UV then scored and folded the job may begin to crack. During use, the cracks will become bigger and the ink may start to chip off. Cracking is normal when coated jobs are scored and folded. The only way to prevent this is to order the job without UV.